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Poppies - LK

Whether you are a beginner or have been gardening for years there is always something to learn from other club members or gardening professionals.

There are 3 sections presented:

  1. A monthly checklist of gardening tasks to help you identify when to plant, prune and do the various tasks that will keep your garden in tip top shape.  These tasks are geared to our Ajax climate.
  2.  Ideas and tips shared by club members or gathered from other clubs, or the wider World.
  3. Links to websites of gardening resources, vendors etc.

Monthly Gardening Checklists

Outdoors (weather permitting):

  • Turn compost for last time; add water.
  • Remove leaves from hostas and other perennials, which become soggy after frost. Discard; do not compost.
  • Finish planting spring flowering bulbs, provided ground isn’t frozen. (Use blood meal to deter squirrels.)
  • Continue to water shrubs, trees, and evergreens. If autumn has been dry, water perennial beds.
  • Drain and put hose away; turn off outside water supply. Empty and protect rain barrels (turn upside down).
  • Protect roses after first hard frost to prevent rodents from nesting. Protect rhododendrons and azaleas.
  • First-year trees and shrubs should be wrapped in burlap for added protection.

Indoors:

  • Order seeds that will be sown in December, January, and February (sweet peas, pansies, petunia, snapdragon, verbena, peppers, eggplant, lettuce).
  • Fertilize Christmas cactus and keep well watered while the flower buds are forming; in mid-December, put into sunny location and continue to feed with half-strength liquid fertilizer.
  • Plant paper-white narcissus bulbs in stones and water for winter forcing.

Outdoors (weather permitting): 

  • Plant deciduous shrubs. 
  • Prune faded blooms off roses and cut back to first healthy, outside bud with 5 leaflets. 
  • Divide perennials. 
  • Take cuttings of impatiens, coleus, and geraniums to winter indoors. 
  • Pot up herbs for indoor use during winter. 
  • Plant new lawn or grass seed/sod when weather cools. 
  • Fertilize lawn. 
  • Plant spring flowering bulbs, using garden compost and small amount of bone meal to enrich soil. 
  • Last chance in early September to prune trees that “bleed” (birches, maples). 
  • Replace spent annuals with fall pansies, mums, fall asters, and kale. 
  • Make autumn arrangements (use bales of hay, cornstalk, pumpkins, gourds, grasses). 
  • Bring houseplants indoors before heat is turned on. 
  • Plant peonies. 
  • Fertilize established peonies with bone meal. 

 

Outdoors (weather permitting): 

  • Plant deciduous shrubs. 
  • Prune faded blooms off roses and cut back to first healthy, outside bud with 5 leaflets. 
  • Divide perennials. 
  • Take cuttings of impatiens, coleus, and geraniums to winter indoors. 
  • Pot up herbs for indoor use during winter. 
  • Plant new lawn or grass seed/sod when weather cools. 
  • Fertilize lawn. 
  • Plant spring flowering bulbs, using garden compost and small amount of bone meal to enrich soil. 
  • Last chance in early September to prune trees that “bleed” (birches, maples). 
  • Replace spent annuals with fall pansies, mums, fall asters, and kale. 
  • Make autumn arrangements (use bales of hay, cornstalk, pumpkins, gourds, grasses). 
  • Bring houseplants indoors before heat is turned on. 
  • Plant peonies. 
  • Fertilize established peonies with bone meal. 
  • Sow collards and Chinese cabbage every week until first of August for constant supply. 
  • Sow kale. 
  • Transplant fibrous begonias. 
  • Remove rose suckers from below soil surface. 
  • Photograph gardens throughout blooming season for records. 
  • Sow endive for September harvest. 
  • Fertilize container plants weekly with half-strength soluble fertilizer. 
  • Deadhead annuals; deadhead perennials (except self-seeding). 
  • Remove seed heads from rhododendrons and lilacs. 
  • Prune evergreen hedges. 
  • Mulch the garden beds. 
  • Stop cutting asparagus and fertilize the bed. 
  • Tie up flowers and vegetables that need staking. 
  • Harvest herbs to encourage growth and keep tidy. 
  • Spread manure around roses. 
  • Prune flowering shrubs after they have finished blooming. 
  • Indoors: 
  • Plan your spring garden based on photos you’ve taken. 

Order autumn crocus and bulbs. 

  • In early May, sow lettuce for summer crop.

  • Note bare spots in the garden that can use a plant/bulb; mark the spot.

  • Prepare flower beds.

  • Plant perennials, noting flowering times, and plan for continuous blooms; divide hostas and many other perennials.

  • Feed iris and check for Iris borer.

  • Tidy up Spring Bulbs, working bone meal into soil around bulbs as they finish blooming (deadhead faded narcissus, hyacinths, and tulips, but leave foliage until brown); deadhead pansies.

  • Plant summer flowering bulbs (freesia, gladiolus, dahlias, lilies and anemones) – use bone meal.

  • Plant annuals and vegetables (sow snap and pole beans, pre-sprouted summer squash, zucchini, spinach, chard, leaf lettuces, beets, radishes and late carrots. Transplant peppers, cosmos, marigold, petunias, geraniums, verbena, and herbs.

  • Buy and plant rhododendron.

  • Fertilize strawberries and mulch between plants.

  • Mulch gardens after annuals are planted.

  • Sow morning glories, beets, herbs, endive, dill and carrots.

  • Transplant basil, parsley, calendula, cleome, nasturtium, impatiens, stocks, alyssum, lobelia and zinnias.

  • Check hostas for slugs.

  • Prune forsythia.

  • Cut dead branches off rose bushes. Spread well-composted cattle manure around roses.

  • Clean water gardens and add new plants.

  • Weeding!

Garden Ideas

Check out some Ideas for old teapots and cups in your garden:

Teapot-birdhouse

Birdhouse or birdfeeder from old boots.

 

Helpful Links: